Calgary 2023

May 18th, Imperial Ballroom, Hyatt Regency Calgary

Inflation. Climate change. Geopolitical conflict. Energy security. These dramatic developments have left no country untouched and are causing a collective rethink of our approaches to energy transition.

The federal government has laid out an ambitious roadmap to get Canada to its 2030 and 2050 climate targets. However, energy transition will last for decades, traditional energy demand continues to surge and consensus on what the country’s energy future should look like has proven elusive.

Canada is uniquely positioned to be a global leader in transforming energy systems and potentially, as a global supplier of choice for energy security. However, overhauling Canada’s energy infrastructure in a relatively short amount of time represents an unprecedented technical challenge that will cost trillions of dollars.

Adding to the complexity, there are many competing technologies in the race to net zero and the mix of energy types that will get us there remains unclear. And if Canada wishes to become a global energy supplier of choice, significant export infrastructure will need to be built.

At the 18th annual Calgary Energy Roundtable on Thursday, May 18th, a high-powered line-up of speakers will share their insights on these topics and how they are affecting the evolution of the Canadian energy sector and its role in the country’s, and the world’s, energy future.

Topics will include:

  • The Energy Outlook
  • Investor perspectives on Canadian energy
  • Company energy transition: internal and external drivers 
  • Commercially ready technologies
  • Canada as a global energy supplier of choice
  • The energy sector’s impact on the broader economy
  • First Nations ownership of resource projects 
  • Decarbonizing production and electrifying industry

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Confirmed Speakers

Derek Evans

Derek Evans

President & CEO, MEG Energy
Ian Dundas

Ian Dundas

President & CEO, Enerplus Corporation
Kevin Neveu

Kevin Neveu

President & CEO, Precision Drilling
Susannah Pierce

Susannah Pierce

President & Country Chair, Shell Canada - tbc
Grant Fagerheim

Grant Fagerheim

President & CEO, Whitecap Resources
Terri-Lee Oleniuk

Terri-Lee Oleniuk

Partner, Blake, Cassels & Graydon LLP
David Chelich

David Chelich

Sector Head, Global Energy and Diversified Industries, TMX Group
Laura Kilcrease

Laura Kilcrease

Chief Executive Officer, Alberta Innovates
Greg Kwong

Greg Kwong

Regional Managing Director and Executive Vice President, CBRE
Kerry Black

Kerry Black

Assistant Professor and Canada Research Chair, Center for Environmental Engineering Research and Education, University of Calgary
Jason Langrish

Jason Langrish

President, The Energy Roundtable
Melanie Bailey

Melanie Bailey

President, ATCO Electric

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Programme

Calgary Energy Roundtable Conference

Thursday, May 18th, Imperial Ballroom, Hyatt Regency Calgary, 700 Centre Street S

Conference MC TBC
 
7:20 am   Registration opens. Breakfast served
 
8:00 am   Opening remarks
8:10 am Video address: Canada’s place in the global energy landscape

  • Speaker to be announced
 
8:30 am   Panel discussion: The Energy Outlook: A key question for Canadian oil and gas producers now that demand for fossil energy has come back is how long it will stay there? In the short term, the picture looks rosy. Many Canadian oil producers have reinvented themselves from growth-oriented explorers to dividend-payers. Natural gas markets are stronger than they have been in years, and a range of initiatives, from petrochemicals to hydrogen, offer promise for energy demand. Under investment in new supply, coupled with energy security concerns, will potentially increase the value of supplies in Canada. However, despite increases in global demand for fossil energy, many new energy projects are a non-starters as governments pledge deep decarbonization, which will include a cap on emissions which will limit future production. The panel will provide perspectives on oil and gas development in Canada going forward.

  • Speakers to be announced
9:15 am   Panel discussion: Investor perspectives on Canadian energy. Investors in Canadian energy have been on a rollercoaster ride over the past 5-10 years. From extreme lows to emerging highs, the energy commodities sector has been notable for its volatility. However, with geopolitical disruption to energy markets, a renewed focus on energy security and a lack of investment in long term production, some say that the Canadian energy sector is poised for a significant continued bull run, despite government pledges for deep decarbonization and barriers to industry expansion. With LNG projects set to come online in a few years and diversification into areas such as petrochemicals, hydrogen and renewables, could Canada position itself as a global supplier of preference? The panel will provide investor perspectives on Canadian energy going forward.

  • Speakers to be announced
10:00 am   Networking break
10:30 am   Pathways for decarbonizing hydrocarbons

  • Speaker to be announced
 
10:50 am   Panel discussion: Company energy transition – internal and external drivers. Energy transition will take decades and while Canada figures out what achieving net zero practically means for the country, companies in the energy industry are undergoing their own internal transitions. We do know that hitting net zero requires companies to make big reductions in emissions through shifting away from burning fossil fuels, while also using technologies that capture, store, and utilize carbon and adding value through industrial processes and with diversification into non-emitting assets such as renewables. The panel will examine the details of what net zero means for the Canadian energy sector and its companies and how we plan to get there.

  • Speakers to be announced
11:30 am Commercially ready technologies that are driving energy transition. Energy companies are facing an unprecedented convergence of technological, social, and regulatory forces. Technologies such as energy storage, CCUS, hydrogen and SMRs have the potential to reshape energy ecosystems. When energy technology is covered in the media, we are told about the problems with existing alternative technologies and the amazing potential of the new technology. If this new and perfect solution is coming up, why would we bother persevering with today’s non-perfect solutions? But we rarely hear about how much risk there is that it won’t work as expected, or how long it might take until it becomes available to use. This is important because we don’t have time to wait for the future’s perfect technologies, as we need action now. The panel will discuss how we can develop more realistic expectations about new technologies and their commercial implementation.

  • Speakers to be announced
12:10 pm   Luncheon
1:00 pm   Keynote address: Canada as a global energy supplier of choice

  • Speaker to be announced
1:30 pm   Panel discussion: The energy sector’s impact on the broader economy. While the energy sector has bounced back, it has not been a driver of job creation as in the past, as companies prefer to return capital to shareholders rather than invest in new projects. On top of this, the federal government intends to cap emissions from the oil and gas sector and push forward with legislation intended to transition these workers toward renewable energy jobs. The ‘just transition” bill is being positioned as a way to lessen the impact on energy workers displaced by the transition to a low-carbon economy. What do these developments in the energy sector mean for the broader economy, from demand for office space to the need for government supports for workers and the communities that they reside in?

  • Speakers to be announced shortly
2:15 pm   Fireside chat: First Nations ownership of energy projects

  • Speaker to be announced
2:40 pm Decarbonizing production and electrifying industry. Electricity provides a tremendous potential competitive advantage in a world focused on carbon reduction, including in the resource sector. The federal government has announced specific net zero targets for the sector by 2035, driving the integration of new technological solutions and products. Given this tension between legacy assets and disruptive technologies, it is essential that the system as a whole provides value and achieves decarbonization in a cost-effective manner. Panelists will discuss how Alberta’s electricity sector is reducing emissions, how electricity companies are helping industrial customers reduce their emissions and how the system as a whole needs to work together to achieve net zero targets by 2035.

  • Speakers to be announced
3:30 pm

3:45 pm

Close by Jason Langrish, President, The Energy Roundtable

Networking reception in the Bonavista Room

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Click here for photos from the 2022 Calgary Energy Roundtable

Click here for photos from the 2019 Calgary Energy Roundtable