Calgary 2024

Thursday, May 16th, Imperial Ballroom, Hyatt Regency Calgary

With less than 30 years left to meet net-zero targets, the impetus is greater than ever for Canada to tackle the energy trilemma of reliability, affordability and continue as a leader in sustainability. There are tremendous opportunities for Canadian businesses prepared for the disruption that energy transition is expected to bring.

And there are challenges. The transition will last for decades and consensus on what Canada’s energy future should look like has proven elusive. Adding to the complexity, there are many competing technologies in the race to net zero and the mix of energy types that will get us there, while becoming clearer, remains unsettled.

Canada is uniquely positioned to be a global leader in transforming energy systems and potentially, as a global supplier of choice for energy security. However, overhauling the country’s energy infrastructure represents an unprecedented technical challenge that will cost trillions of dollars and take years to complete.

At the 19th annual Calgary Energy Roundtable on Thursday, May 16th, a high-powered line-up of speakers will share their insights on these topics, including how they are affecting the evolution of the Canadian energy sector and its role in the country’s, and the world’s, energy future. Topics will include:

  • The energy outlook
  • Investor perspectives on Canadian energy
  • Innovative energy infrastructure solutions
  • Energy system sustainability
  • The politics of energy technologies
  • Can Canada become an energy superpower?
  • Energy and industrial competitiveness
  • First Nations ownership of resource projects

Register Now

View Programme 

Speakers

Heather Chalmers

Heather Chalmers

President & Chief Executive Officer, GE Canada
Adam Waterous

Adam Waterous

Managing Partner & CEO, Waterous Energy Fund
Tim Gould

Tim Gould

Chief Energy Economist, International Energy Agency (Paris)
Hon. Lisa Raitt

Hon. Lisa Raitt

Vice Chair, Global Investment Banking, CIBC
Ed Rihn

Ed Rihn

President & CEO, Berkshire Hathaway Energy Canada
Greg Kwong

Greg Kwong

Regional Managing Director and Executive Vice President, CBRE
Dawn Farrell

Dawn Farrell

President & CEO, Trans Mountain Pipeline
Mike Belenkie

Mike Belenkie

President & CEO, Advantage Energy / Entropy
Mark Poweska

Mark Poweska

President & CEO, ENMAX
Susannah Pierce

Susannah Pierce

President & Country Chair, Shell Canada
Avik Dey

Avik Dey

President & CEO, Capital Power
Kevin Neveu

Kevin Neveu

President & CEO, Precision Drilling
Dr. Lance Mortlock

Dr. Lance Mortlock

Managing Partner, Energy & Resources, EY
Evan Siddall

Evan Siddall

President & CEO, AIMCo
Michelle Chislett

Michelle Chislett

Executive Vice President, Onshore Renewables, Northland Power
Jeff Pearson

Jeff Pearson

President, Wolf Carbon
Dr. Kerry Black

Dr. Kerry Black

Assistant Professor and Canada Research Chair in the Center for Environmental Engineering Research and Education (CEERE) and the Department of Civil Engineering, University of Calgary
Mike Ireland

Mike Ireland

Vice President, Business Development, Michels Canada
Jason Langrish

Jason Langrish

President, The Energy Roundtable

Print programme

Programme

Calgary Energy Roundtable Conference

Thursday, May 16th, Imperial Ballroom, Hyatt Regency Calgary, 700 Centre Street S

Conference MC Jason Langrish, President, The Energy Roundtable
 
7:20 am   Registration opens. Breakfast served.
8:00 am   Welcome remarks
 
8:05 am

Video presentation: The energy outlook

  • Tim Gould, Chief Energy Economist, International Energy Agency
8:20 am   Panel discussion: The Energy Outlook. Canada’s upstream oil and gas industry and drilling services sector has a very favourable outlook for 2024. Oil prices are expected to remain strong, demand will be robust, export capacity will increase, and investment and drilling activity are set to grow during the forecast period. The key question for Canadian oil and gas producers lies beyond 2024, as production is expected to peak by 2030 and then steadily decline, not just in Canada, but also globally, until 2050. A range of initiatives, from LNG to petrochemicals to hydrogen, offer promise for energy demand. Energy security concerns will potentially increase the value of supplies in Canada. However, despite global demand, many new energy projects are a non-starters as governments pledge deep decarbonization, which will include a cap on emissions, which will limit future production. The panel will provide perspectives on oil and gas development in Canada going forward.

  • Speakers to be announced
9:00 am   Panel discussion: Investor perspectives on Canadian energy. Investors in Canadian energy have been on a rollercoaster ride over the past 5-10 years. From extreme lows to emerging highs, the energy commodities sector has been notable for its volatility. However, with geopolitical disruption to energy markets, a renewed focus on energy security and a lack of investment in long term production, the Canadian energy sector has undergone a bull run, despite government pledges for deep decarbonization and barriers to industry expansion. With LNG projects set to come online in a few years and diversification into areas such as petrochemicals, hydrogen and renewables, could Canada still position itself as a global energy power? The panel will provide investor perspectives on Canadian energy going forward.
9:45 am   Networking break 
 
10:15 am   Panel discussion: Energy system sustainability. As pressure continues to build to shift energy systems away from one dominated by hydrocarbons, interest in sustainable assets is expanding, as investors seek out positions that reduce their exposure to climate change, as well as the risk of stranded assets. This is a moment for energy companies to make thoughtful choices to improve their economic and reputational resilience. A number of these companies have already set net-zero-emissions targets and are sustaining efforts to decarbonize their operations and their value chains. In addition, provincial and federal mandates, coupled with consumer choice and technological innovations, are driving change, including making Canada’s grid carbon neutral and demand for alternative energy products, such as zero emissions vehicles. The panel will examine how we can best optimize existing assets while bringing online non-emitting sources to ensure a meaningful, and sustainable, transformation in the energy sector.

  • Speakers to be announced
11:00 am   Fireside chat: First Nations ownership of energy projects

  • Speakers to be announced
11:30 am   Panel discussion: Innovative energy infrastructure solutions. The energy transition is not just about sourcing clean energy, but investing in innovative infrastructure that will support a low-carbon economy. The energy infrastructure sector is uniquely positioned to leverage sustainable opportunities that can lower carbon emissions for the sector, its customers and the broader economy. From technological innovations such as AI, to renewable fuels, carbon capture, renewable power or efficiency improvements, companies are exploring a multitude of options while keeping their eyes on returns on capital. The appetite for sustainable energy options continues to increase and the sector is well positioned to widen its service offering toward low-carbon initiatives given the low cost of capital, existing infrastructure and development experience. The panel will discuss approaches to infrastructure investment to achieve net zero goals and trends for the sector.

  • Speakers to be announced
12:10 pm Luncheon 
1:00 pm   Keynote address
1:25 pm   Fireside chat: Energy and industrial competitiveness. Canada and its trading partners are locked in an intense competition to draw high value manufacturing and production to their jurisdictions. These global investors typically have a mandate to source their energy and electricity inputs from non-emitting sources. Panelists will examine to role of energy market design, government supports and infrastructure in creating a competitive, innovative ecosystem for major industrial consumers and investments.

  • Speakers to be announced
1:55 pm   Panel discussion: The politics of energy technologies. Technologies such as energy storage, CCUS, hydrogen and SMRs have the potential to reshape energy ecosystems. When energy technology is covered in the media, we are told about the problems with existing alternative technologies and the amazing potential of the new technology. If this new and perfect solution is coming up, why would we bother persevering with today’s non-perfect solutions? But we rarely hear about how much risk there is, or how long it might take until it becomes available to use, which is important as we need action now. These technologies can be either advanced or held back depending on the political environment and which technologies are prioritized and how. The panel will discuss how we can develop realistic expectations about new technologies and their commercial implementation.

  • Speakers to be announced
2:40 pm   Panel discussion: Can Canada become an energy superpower? Energy security determines a nations productivity, impact’s its industrial capabilities, determines wealth and support’s social programs, and ultimately impacts food supply and price stability.  The wealth of a nation is measured, and determined, by access to affordable and plentiful energy. The war in Ukraine has been a wake-up call to western nations regarding the potential impacts and consequences of not considering and preparing for the geopolitics of energy security. Is Canada ready? Can we play a leading role in shaping global energy security? This panel examines both domestic and international implications of energy security, from nuclear power to traditional fossil fuels, and Canada’s role in this new paradigm shift.

  • Speakers to be announced
3:30 pm Close by Jason Langrish, President, The Energy Roundtable
3:45 pm Networking reception in the Imperial Ballroom foyer
Presenting Sponsor
Luncheon Sponsor
Reception Sponsor
Gold Sponsors
Silver Sponsors
Table Hosts

2023 Conference Photos

Reception photos

Click here for photos from the 2022 Calgary Energy Roundtable

Click here for photos from the 2019 Calgary Energy Roundtable